• 8 Ways to Overcome the Fears Blocking Your Path to Success

    Developing the resilience needed to overcome inevitable setbacks starts with seeing yourself in a new, more forgiving way.

    Everyone has lessons they can teach us about success, and that’s just as true for kids as it is adults. I recently spoke to Damali Elliott, the founder and Chief Dream Builder of Petals-n-Belles, an organization based in New York City that empowers disadvantaged girls through creative workshops, real-world experiences and academic coaching. I love something Elliott said about her girls that I think is true for all of us. Resilience is something they all have even if they don’t know it.

    So, how do we access that resilient part of ourselves and get rid of the learned helplessness that’s holding us back? Elliott does it by taking lessons from the girls around her, and we can too.

    Petals-n-Belles hand picks girls who need to be shown there’s a better life out there waiting for them, then provides mentors, opportunities and athletic events — I love that, and I’m hoping to welcome some of them as Spartans — to help reset their expectations and succeed in life. Right now Elliott has 68 girls in various phases of the program, and they keep coming back, often to mentor the younger girls. You know you’re a success when you see a girl who once didn’t even have a place to call home coming back to visit from college.

    So what can we learn from Elliott’s experience? There’s a lot of great stuff here:

    1. Tell a new story.

    In order to let go of the past you need to create a fresh way of seeing the world. My friend Dr. Johnny Waite says to change your behavior, you first need to change your belief.

    2. Try again.

    Elliott has had tough days and plenty of setbacks where she wanted to quit. But the reason her organization is a success is that she got back up and kept trying. I’ve had plenty of days when I wanted to quit, too. Elliott says when she has days like that, she looks at how her girls keep on going and thinks, how could she do any less?

    3. Model the energy you want to see in the world.

    The girls have a positive, infectious energy that can transform a room. No matter what is going on at the time, when Elliott walks into a meeting, she leaves all the negatives behind and brings positive energy with her.

    4. Battle resistance with gratitude.

    There’s always going to be resistance in anything you want to do in life. Seeing how grateful the girls are for their opportunities reminds us that the best motivation is to ignore barriers and be grateful for everything we’ve been given to overcome obstacles.

    5. Face your fears.

    The belles take a trapeze course to teach them how to seize their dreams. When they tell Elliott how the challenge scares them, she asks, “What would you do if that trapeze bar was your dream? Go out there and grab it.” The best way to empower yourself is to do the thing you think you can’t do — then crush it!

    6. Accept your losses.

    Like me, Elliott has had participants leave the program for various reasons, often because they just weren’t ready for it. And, like me, she’s had them come back later and ask to return. By accepting your losses and moving on, you leave room for growth and reconnection.

    7. Bounce back.

    Be inspired by Elliott’s kids and your own and watch how naturally children get up and try again when they fall. That inner resilience is still inside of you.

    8. Dream big.

    Build a dream that gives you a reason to stretch outside of your comfort zone and push pass resistance. As Elliott says, you can fill in the details later.

     

     

    Source: entrepreneur.com

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  • The Most Powerful Brands in Franchising

    Here are the strongest brands in franchising for 2017, ranked.

    There are many ways to measure the strength of a franchise. How many units does it have? What are its financials? Its growth? How well does it support its franchisees? But this month, for the first time ever, Entrepreneur is zeroing in on a factor that’s challenging to measure, easily overlooked and yet critical to the health of any business: branding.

    We wanted to know: Which franchises have done the best job of building themselves up as beloved, recognizable, robust brands? We did this by analyzing factors such as social media followers, system size, number of years in business, number of years franchising and overall reputation — and looking at how they all combine to form lasting relationships with fans.

    Our list shows that great brands are a paradox. Longevity and consistency matter, but only if a brand also constantly evolves. A prime example is KFC, which tops our list. On the following pages, you can see how its recent “Re-Colonelization” efforts have paid off, and learn how other top franchise brands stay fresh while maintaining their already strong foundations.

    Please keep in mind that this list is not intended as a recommendation of any particular company. A vibrant brand is just one of many elements to consider when buying a franchise; it’s critical that you do due diligence before investing in any opportunity. Read the company’s legal documents, consult with an attorney and an accountant and talk to as many existing and former franchisees as you can.

    To learn who made the cut, check out our list of The Most Powerful Brands in Franchising.

     

    Source: entrepreneur.com

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  • Dustin Mathews’ Top 5 Must-Have Business Books

    See what the co-author of ‘No B.S. Guide to Powerful Presentations’ thinks you should read to succeed in business.

    Entrepreneur Reads is a series designed to bring our readers the best books to motivate you on your entrepreneurial journey. We’ve asked public speaking expert and Entrepreneur Press author Dustin Mathews for his top 5 book recommendations for entrepreneurs like you.

    “My favorite book of all time is experience.” —Noah Kagan, founder of AppSumo

    I couldn’t agree more with Kagan.

    Nothing takes the place of doing in the real world, and there are key books that every entrepreneur should have in their library. Let’s take a look at five must-have business books.

    1. How to Win Friends & Influence People by Dale Carnegie

    How can you go wrong with one of the bestselling self-help books of all time? With over 30 million copies sold, this “oldie but goodie” shows you how to make lasting relationships in business and life.

    In our ever-expanding, high-tech world of gadgetry and automation, this book serves as a great reminder that success in business comes back to relationships — with people. Whether it’s prospects, partners or team members, you’ll need to win them all over at some point in your travels. Look for the six ways to make people like you and the twelve ways to win people to your way of thinking.

    2. Think & Grow Rich by Napoleon Hill

    If Warren Buffet, Bill Gates, Richard Branson and Mark Zuckerberg were all interviewed today about success and we put their answers into a book it would be essentially what Think & Grow Rich was at the time. Napoleon Hill interviewed the titans of business of the day — Henry Ford, Andrew Carnegie and Thomas Edison — to deliver us the entrepreneur’s mental mindset handbook.

    Richard Branson said, “Tough times are inevitable in life and in business. But, how you compose yourself during those times defines your spirit and will define your future.” No doubt, the road of an entrepreneur is long, winding and daunting. It’s Hill that reminds us how to get anything we desire in business with the right mindset. Be sure to look for the “Power of the Mastermind.”

    3. The Ultimate Sales Letter by Dan S. Kennedy

    Every communication in business needs to sell. Whether it’s an email to an employee, conversation with a partner or phone call to prospects, customers and clients, influencing is critical for getting it done.

    The challenge is most people don’t think in these terms. In one of Dan Kennedy’s first works, he lays out the formula for writing a message that sells. Essentially, he’d prefer all business owners be world-class copywriters, however he understands they don’t have the time nor the patience. So, inside the book he’s provided simple, yet proven formulas, case studies, examples and resources for hacking your way to a letter that closes the deal, every time.

    Words matter. Are you making yours count?

    4. Never Eat Alone by Keith Ferrazzi

    It bears repeating: You won’t get far in business if you can’t make solid relationships with others. Keith Ferrazzi shows us that we can get anywhere in life and business by connecting and creating powerful relationships.

    My big takeaway from the book is to keep in check the balance of helping others without expecting to ask for something in return. Of course, this can be tricky if you find yourself in the wrong crowd or in front of a “taker,” but the philosophy is one that resonates today. Look for “Connecting with Connectors,” as this can be an extremely beneficial concept in terms of creating speed and finding the right connections to help you on your path.

    5. The Ultimate Sales Machine by Chet Holmes

    If you need to make it rain, look no further. Really, The Ultimate Sales Machine is a combination of sales, marketing, time management and mindset or, as Chet Holmes, calls it “pig-headed discipline” all packed into one resource.

    One of the more unique (and daring) ideas from the book I’ve put into action for myself is showing up at a tradeshow with a theme. In the book, Holmes discusses working with a client, having them dress up in Hawaiian outfits, theming the booth with a beach backdrop and making it fun for the team and most certainly for attendees.

    Following suit, we decided on a doctors theme, bought lab coats with stethoscopes and put pill bottles in the conference bag. Doing so, we most certainly were the talk of the convention, garnered a lot of attention and generated a good number of sales.  We even noticed non-attendees in the lobby, double taking, as they were curious as to know what we were doing.

    Be sure to look for the Holmes’s classified ad for attracting the right kind of sales people, “superstars.”

     

    Source: entrepreneur.com

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  • Finding the Right First Partner Can Benefit You Over a Lifetime in Business

    There is no perfect playbook on how you should go about choosing a business partner. But there are some general guidelines that I find useful to consider.

    The best business decision I ever made was choosing my first business partner. Picking the right business partner straight out of the gate creates a relationship that will help you in business in perpetuity. When most people look for their first partner, they are thinking about who the perfect fit for their company would be at that time. But that’s shortsighted. The decision isn’t about a specific business. The decision is about who you are going to place into your life for one of the most important relationships you can have.

    I judge potential business partnerships by asking myself whether I could see this person in my life 20-plus years from now, and contemplate whether I can imagine us both still adding value to the other’s life.

    My first business partner defied normal convention. He was young, unproven and fresh out of college. Yet, I could see he was immensely talented and together we had that “X factor,” that undeniable synergy where we both brought out the best in each other. We ended up working through seven different companies together and he’s been my CFO, COO and CTO in three different types of ventures. Now he runs a private venture fund. Although we don’t work together anymore, we stay in close contact, co-invest in new ventures and turn to each other for advice when we need to tap the other’s areas of expertise.

    That’s why your first business partner is so important. If you are smart about it and have a little luck you’ll find someone that will positively impact your life and career many times over.

    There is no perfect playbook on how you should go about choosing a business partner. But there are some general guidelines that I find useful to consider.

    Make sure you know the person.

    This may seem like common sense, but lots of people enter into partnerships without really spending the time to know who they are getting into business with. The person may look good on paper and have extraordinary qualifications, but a partnership needs so much more than that. Remember, you’re not looking for a rockstar employee — you’re looking for someone that is going to be your other half. Many describe a business partnership as similar to marriage. While 50 percent of marriages end in divorce, that number jumps to nearly 80 percent for business partnerships.

    My partner and I worked together on a nonprofit that oversaw student conferences, which was a massive logistical and operational undertaking. We ended up setting up our own foundation to oversee the conferences and through our work together we were able to forge a bond before becoming partners.

    Don’t pick yourself.

    You should look for a business partner that complements you, not one that is a copy of you. If your strength is creativity, then you might look for someone who is more process-oriented. If you’re a master salesperson but business finance isn’t your strongpoint, maybe consider a partner who understands business accounting.

    People who are similar to you might feel like the more comfortable choice, but that’s not what you or the business needs to be successful. The wider variety of skills that you and your partner bring separately to the table, the easier it will be to propel the business forward.

    Look for vision and values.

    Since you and your partner will need to constantly set goals and make decisions to drive the business forward, it is extremely important that you are both trying to head in the same direction — that you share the same vision for the future. Every decision should be like two bricklayers laying brick by brick according to the blueprint, not going off and creating separate structures.

    You also want someone who holds the same values as you do because that’s necessary to build the type of trust needed for a successful partnership. You should look for someone you find to value honesty and truth, someone who follows sound business ethics and is just an overall good person in their personal life.

    Find someone fun.

    This may be one of the most important aspects. It’s that X factor I mentioned. You’re going to spend more time with this person than with your friends and family — even your spouse. Your relationship will be pressure-tested day in and out, and there needs to be that element of friendship and camaraderie you share with each other to make it through those challenging times and come out stronger.

    I couldn’t have asked for a better first business partner. Although I’ve provided a few recommendations, remember that for this type of decision it is really important to trust your gut and look for warning signs early on. Don’t settle for partnering with someone who you think will be good enough to do the job — look for someone who will be good enough to go through 10 different ventures over the next few decades with you.

     

    Source: entrepreneur.com

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  • ‘Hate Is a Cancer,’ Apple CEO Writes in Email to Employees

    ‘This is not about the left or the right, conservative or liberal,’ Tim Cook wrote in response to the protests and violence in Charlottesville.

    On the evening of Aug. 16, Apple CEO Tim Cook sent an email to all Apple employees addressing the protests and violence in Charlottesville, Va., as well as President Donald Trump’s response to the events.

    In the letter, he denounced the behavior and beliefs of the white supremacist groups who organized in Charlottesville, as well as President Trump’s characterization of their actions and ideals in remarks the president has given throughout the week.

    “I disagree with the president and others who believe that there is a moral equivalence between white supremacists and Nazis, and those who oppose them by standing up for human rights,” Cook wrote. “Equating the two runs counter to our ideals as Americans.”

    Prior to sending this internal memo, Cook expressed similar sentiments via Twitter in the immediate aftermath of the events.

    In addition to these public stances, Cook in February spoke out against the initial travel ban executive order President Trump signed to halt U.S. immigration from Muslim-majority nations. Apple joined 96 other firms in signing an amicus brief opposing the ban. The brief stated that the order “discriminate[d] on the basis of national origin and religion” and was “inflicting substantial harm on U.S. companies.”

    Cook’s letter to employees this week called on Apple employees to stand together as equals in the face of hate, and it announced that the corporation is committmed to donating more than $2 million to civil rights organizations.

    Read the full email below.

    Team,

    Like so many of you, equality is at the core of my beliefs and values. The events of the past several days have been deeply troubling for me, and I’ve heard from many people at Apple who are saddened, outraged or confused.

    What occurred in Charlottesville has no place in our country. Hate is a cancer, and left unchecked it destroys everything in its path. Its scars last generations. History has taught us this time and time again, both in the United States and countries around the world.

    We must not witness or permit such hate and bigotry in our country, and we must be unequivocal about it. This is not about the left or the right, conservative or liberal. It is about human decency and morality. I disagree with the president and others who believe that there is a moral equivalence between white supremacists and Nazis, and those who oppose them by standing up for human rights. Equating the two runs counter to our ideals as Americans.

    Regardless of your political views, we must all stand together on this one point — that we are all equal. As a company, through our actions, our products and our voice, we will always work to ensure that everyone is treated equally and with respect.

    I believe Apple has led by example, and we’re going to keep doing that. We have always welcomed people from every walk of life to our stores around the world and showed them that Apple is inclusive of everyone. We empower people to share their views and express themselves through our products.

    In the wake of the tragic and repulsive events in Charlottesville, we are stepping up to help organizations who work to rid our country of hate. Apple will be making contributions of $1 million each to the Southern Poverty Law Center and the Anti-Defamation League. We will also match two-for-one our employees’ donations to these and several other human rights groups, between now and September 30.

    In the coming days, iTunes will offer users an easy way to join us in directly supporting the work of the SPLC.

    Dr. Martin Luther King said, “Our lives begin to end the day we become silent about the things that matter.” So, we will continue to speak up. These have been dark days, but I remain as optimistic as ever that the future is bright. Apple can and will play an important role in bringing about positive change.

    Best,
    Tim

    Source: entrepreneur.com

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  • If You’re Trying to Raise Money, Doing Any of These 9 Things May Scare off Investors

    Avoid these mistakes and funding could be yours.

    Most new and existing businesses can benefit from outside funding. With such funding, they can grow faster, launch new initiatives, gain competitive advantage and make better long-term decisions as they can think beyond short-term issues like making payroll.

    Unfortunately, though, most entrepreneurs and business owners make several mistakes that prevent them from raising capital. These mistakes are detailed below. Avoid them and funding could be yours.

     Making unrealistic market size claims

    Sophisticated investors need to understand how big your relevant market size is and if it’s feasible for you to eventually become a dominant market player.

    The key here is “relevant” and not just “market.” For example, if you create a medical device to cure foot pain, while your “market” is the trillion-dollar healthcare market, that is way too broad a definition.

    Rather, your relevant market can be more narrowly defined as not just the medical devices market but the market for medical devices for foot pain. In narrowing your scope, you can better determine the actual size of your market. For instance, you can determine the number of foot pain sufferers each year seeking medical attention and then multiply that by the price they might pay for your device.

    Failing to respect your competitors

    Oftentimes companies tell investors they have no competitors. This often scares investors as they think if there are no competitors, a market doesn’t really exist.

    Almost every business has either direct or indirect competitors. Direct competitors offer the same product or service to the same customers. Indirect competitors offer a similar product to the same customers, or the same product to different customers.

    For example, if you planned to open an Italian restaurant in a town that previously did not have one, you could correctly say that you don’t have any direct competitors. However, indirect competitors would include every other restaurant in town, supermarkets and other venues to purchase food.

    Likewise, don’t downplay your competitors. Saying that your competitors are universally terrible is rarely true; there’s always something they’re doing right that’s keeping them in business.

    Showing unrealistic financial projections

    Businesses take time to grow. Even companies like Facebook and Google, with amazing amounts of funding at their disposal, took years to grow to their current sizes. It takes time to build a team, improve brand awareness and scale your business. So, don’t expect your company to grow revenues exponentially out of the gate. Likewise, you will incur many expenses while growing your business for which you must account.

    As such, when building your financial projections, be sure to use reasonable revenue and cost assumptions. If not, you will frighten investors, or worse yet, raise funding and then fail since you run out of cash.

    Presenting investors with a novel — or a napkin

    While investors will want to meet you before funding your business, they will also require a business plan that explains your business opportunity and why it will be successful.

    Your business plan should not be a novel; investors don’t have time to wade through 100 pages to learn the keys to your success. Conversely, you can’t adequately answer investors’ key questions on the back of a napkin.

    A 15- to 25-page business plan is the optimum length to convey the required information to investors.

    Not understanding your metrics

    How much does it cost to acquire a customer? What is your expected lifetime customer value?

    While sometimes it’s impossible to understand these metrics when you launch your business, you must determine them as soon as possible.

    Without these metrics, you won’t know how much money to raise. For instance, if you hope to gain 1,000 customers this year, but don’t know the cost to acquire a customer, you won’t know how much money you need for sales and marketing.

    Likewise, understanding your metrics allows you and your team to work more effectively in setting and achieving growth goals.

    Acting like know-it-alls

    While investors want you to be an expert in your market, they don’t expect you to be an expert in everything. More so, most businesses must adapt to changing market conditions over time, and entrepreneurs who feel they know everything generally don’t fare well.

    A good investor has seen many investments fail and others become great successes. Such experiences have made them great advisors. They’ve encountered all types of situations and understand how to navigate them.

    If you’re seeking funding, acknowledge such investors’ experiences. Let them know that while you are an expert in your market, you will seek their ideas and advice in marketing, sales, hiring, product development and/or other areas needed to grow your business.

    Focusing too much on products and product features

    When raising funding, you need to show you’re building a great company and not just a great product or service. While a great product or service is often the cornerstone to a great company, without skills like sales, marketing, human resources, operations and financial management, you cannot thrive.

    Furthermore, if your product has a great feature, be sure to specify how you will create barriers to entry, such as via patent protection, so competitors can’t simply copy it.

    Exaggerating too much

    When you exaggerate to investors who know you’re exaggerating, you lose credibility.

    One key way to exaggerate is with your financial projections as discussed above. There are many other ways to exaggerate. For instance, saying you have the world’s leading authorities on the XYZ market is great, but only if they really are the world’s leading authorities.

    Likewise if you say it would take competitors three years to catch up on your technology, when investors ask others in your industry, they better confirm this time period. If not, your credibility and funding will be lost.

    Lacking focus

    What do investors care about? They care about getting a return on their investment. As such, anything you say that supports that will be welcomed.

    For instance, talk about your great product that has natural barriers to entry. Discuss your management team that is well-qualified to execute on the opportunity. Talk about strategic partners that will help you generate leads and sales faster.

    But, don’t go off on tangents that don’t specifically relate to how you earn investors returns, like the fact that you’re a great tennis player.

    Likewise, conveying too many ideas shows you lack focus. For instance, saying you’re going to launch product one next year, and then quickly launch products two, three and four, will frighten investors. Why? Because they’ll want to see product one be a massive success before you even consider launching something new.

    Investors have two scarce resources: their time and their money. Avoid the above mistakes when you spend time with investors, and hopefully they’ll reward you with their money.

     

    Source: entrepreneur.com

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  • Has Your Business Stopped Growing? Here’s How to Turn Things Around.

    There are four big reasons businesses stall out. It happened to me.

    Has your business ever stalled out and simply stopped growing?

    It happened to me. Early on in my career as an entrepreneur, I couldn’t figure out why everything stalled. But lucky for me, I didn’t quit there. I kept working, changed my business, and now — having worked with thousands of business owners — I have discovered that the primary reasons a business stops growing tend to land into a handful of categories.

    1. Lack of opportunity

    Some businesses just aren’t made to scale up. When I first started in the dry-cleaning delivery niche, I didn’t understand this simple fact: Business in my little area was never going to be a million-dollar business, let alone a multimillion-dollar business, no matter how hard I worked. Make sure you aren’t trying to win the Super Bowl with a peewee football team.

    On a side note, when I make this argument, sometimes people argue the point. For example, they may tell me I could have expanded into other areas or franchised. Of course, I’m not saying there aren’t ways to scale a business, but some businesses are simply easier and less risky to scale than others. If you are in an industry that is challenging to scale, one where your risk of failure is super high, it may be a good idea to start looking into other opportunities.

    2. Boredom

    It’s amazing how many of us get bored. We get bored with our marketing, with our product, with our niche. Our boredom causes us to cancel marketing, taking our eye off the main business to focus on some new exciting startup we want to work on.

    Want to sell and jump into a new exciting niche where every prospect only says yes and sales come easily? I get it. I’m not immune to those feelings. But, making changes because we are bored is insanity! If you have an ATM machine that spits out hundred-dollar bills, why would you try to rewire it? This is what people do with their marketing or when they take focus off the main cash cow business. I can’t tell you how many times I’ve heard someone say they are stopping what’s working because they want to try something new. It’s just crazy.

    3. People

    If you read the crap that comes from some marketers, you’d think that everyone was making money easily, using only the internet with no problems, no skills and no employees. While I do know people I could describe that way who are making money, this is the exception and not the rule. It would be like me pointing to a group of billionaires and selling thousands of products with the premise being: “Just buy this product and you too can be a billionaire.”

    In almost all businesses it takes employees (or at least outsourced labor) to grow. If you’ve stalled, it may be because you need to invest in another employee or two to kick-start the growth. I get it, when you invest in employees, payroll is bloated, short-term profits go down, and it is risky. But guess what? You’re a business owner — that’s the job. And 99.99 percent of businesses need employees to make money.

    4. Too externally focused

    As I write this, I’m in the middle of planning next year’s marketing strategy. I will have a number of new and exciting items on the list (external stuff), but one of the most interesting numbers I’m working on is a plan for our sales call conversion rate. With no increases in the number of calls next year, a 5 percent increase in conversion would equal an additional $1.152 milion in annual revenue. That is an internal number worth focusing on.

    I’ll also be looking at how to reduce customer churn, improve employee performance and increase referrals. Just focusing on internalopportunities, we have the potential to add millions in new revenue and/or cost reductions due to improved performance, which leads to increased margins. If you’re not thinking about ways to work on these internal opportunities, you’re leaving tons of new revenue and profit on the table.

    Growing a business isn’t easy, but it is pretty simple, assuming you have opportunity in the current business model. You just have to be willing to invest. Invest in yourself (your business education), and invest in your company by hiring the right people, focusing on improving your systems and process.

    We’ve talked about why businesses stop growing, and the first two points looked at those reasons, but the last two points could easily be turned around and used as the start of a growth strategy.

    • Who should you hire right now?
    • What internal challenges could you fix that would have an increase on profits?
    • Can you do a better job converting prospects into customers?
    • How are you doing on upsells?
    • What about referrals?
    • Do your customers know who you are, what you do, and that you’re still in business? If not, how are you going to change that?
    • What is the communication strategy for both prospects and customers?

    I could go on, but you get the point.

    The decision to grow (or not grow) is yours; you’re armed with the information. Now you just need to take action.

     

    Source: entrepreneur.com

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  • Success Requires Knowing What You Won’t Compromise

    Flexibility and tolerance are important but know what you won’t bend on is crucial.

    People always ask we: “What are the keys to success in life and business?”

    I could talk for hours on the subject — particularly about what’s worked for me. But, truth is, all successful people answer a bit differently. That’s why, when I meet people like Elizabeth Weil, a dedicated distance runner and one of the most successful women in the venture capital field, I ask them the same question. I want to learn from them.

    Exercise

    As a child, Weil watched her mother take up running and swimming as therapy for a divorce. She’d wake up before dawn to get in a good swim or run — every day, no matter what. Morning exercise was non-negotiable. “She was out the door every morning around 4, because she knew that time of day was not going to be compromised by work or family or anything else,” Weil says today. “She could always get her workout in.”

    Today, Weil treats her run with the same reverence—even with three kids (including infant twins) and an incredibly demanding career. “For me,” she says, “running is a non-negotiable. Every job, every vacation, every business trip, I have my running shoes and I make time for it. Usually I get up very early, like my mother, and I just get it done. I feed one baby, I feed the other baby, and then I get out the door.”

    This doesn’t mean that life doesn’t occasionally happen in unexpected ways. “Things do come up, but I still get my running in.”

    It probably helps that Weil surrounds herself with like-minded people. “My husband is also an ultra-runner,” she says. “We joke that if going out to brunch was a non-negotiable, our relationship probably wouldn’t work.”

    The “how-to” of Weil’s success.

    When I asked Weil to boil her success down to a few takeaways, she answers immediately, which tells me that I’m talking to a person with a clear and well-defined plan for success. With Weil, these four elements underlie everything else:

    1. Create time for non-negotiables. “Along with my daily run,” she says, “another non-negotiable is spending time with my family, which is a lot harder now that I have three kids instead of just one.”
    2. Work with people you like. “Great people empower you and make you a better person,” she says.
    3. Live and work in a great location. “Life is too short to be in a place where you can’t do the things you like to do,” she says.
    4. Have a personal advisory board. “Fill it with people from all aspects of your life—an old college professor, an old colleague, your best friend, just people who know you really well,” she says. “You can check in with them and use them as part of your gut check as you go through life.”

    Work with great people.

    Working with great people, in a great location, and carving out time for non-negotiables are also parts of my long-standing recipe for success. However, Weil’s fourth element—having a personal advisory board—is a new one for me, and I’m going to put that into practice.

    Be a “people” person.

    Weil also talks about the fact that success in business is about more than just working your butt off. Admittedly, you need to work really, really hard in the job you’ve got if you want people to respect you and give you better opportunities. But you also need to be a people person.

    “I learned this the hard way because I didn’t make time for people when I was at Twitter,” she says. “I was so busy with my job there that I didn’t make connections for my next job. I tell people now, ‘When you pop up for your next job, you’ll wish you had gotten to know more people.’

    You won’t get a job just by uploading your résumé.

    You almost never get a job by uploading your résumé to a blind website. Jobs come from people you know, word of mouth, so you need to be good at your job and to also foster relationships.”

    The simple truth is that very few women are high-level decision makers at venture capital firms. Weil is one of only a handful. But it doesn’t surprise me at all that she has made it to the top when so many others haven’t, because she learned how to be successful early on from her mom.

    A life, business, and parenting tool.

    Another thing I take away from my conversation with Weil: Our kids watch us and they learn from what we do. We owe them the extra effort. My kids watch me with my non-negotiables, which for me are health and wellness and with the effort I put into my business and family.

    My kids learn what it takes to succeed without me sitting them down and lecturing them. I live the lesson, and that is a pretty awesome parenting tool.

    Source: entrepreneur.com

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