×
  • 6 Ways to Save Your Business Thousands Each Month

    Cutting costs is always quicker and easier than bringing in more revenue.

     

    For the majority of small business owners, cash is most definitely king. In hopes of increasing their bottom line, business owners often pay themselves much less than they deserve. The truth is, you have to spend money to make money. That being said, there’s no reason why you shouldn’t be saving wherever possible. While some tips work better than others, here are a few you can implement right away and start saving.

    1. Bootstrap as long as you can.

    In an era of endless technology and knowledge, it’s probably “been done before”. Just because you have competition, doesn’t mean you’re too late. There’s always room to find your niche and provide value where your competitors can’t. This is actually a great way to save yourself time and money.

    Whenever possible, look to work with larger companies and utilize their pre-existing technologies or infrastructure. You can either swap services or create a revenue-sharing agreement in exchange for access to their services. Ideally, they will allow you to white-label their products so you can create an original brand presence. This strategy will surely save you thousands and give your business time to build out your own products and or services.

    2. Optimize your purchasing power.

    Taking advantage of group buying and collective purchasing is a great way to save cash. By joining these groups you’ll have access to discounts and exclusive rates on office supplies, hardware, business travel, and much more.

    There are plenty of group buying services you can utilize based on your particular business needs. If you’re a non-profit, ThriveGPO provides a great group purchasing tool. If you’re a smart business owner, you’ll never buy alone.

    3. Barter your way to growth.

    If you’re looking to avoid cash outlays or unload slow-moving inventory you can always look to swap your products and services for others. Bartering with other companies can be time consuming, so if you’d rather not bargain with other companies directly you can always hire a commissioned barter broker. Otherwise, you can join a commercial barter club or exchange.

    The National Association of Trade Exchanges (NATE) is a registered clearing house for member exchanges nationwide. NATE essentially allows business owners to swap any product or service with anyone. When a sale is made, participants will often receive trade dollars for their goods and services. Trade dollars are brokered across cities nationwide under NATE.

    4. Get your business credit card rewards.

    If you haven’t done so already, it’s a good idea to apply for a business credit card. Since issuing banks assume business owners will spend more on a business card than a personal card, the rewards tend to be much more enticing. According to NerdWallet, here are the best small business credit cards of 2017:

    • Ink Business Cash Credit Card: Best for cash back
    • The Enhanced Business Platinum Card from American Express: Best for airport lounge access
    • Capital One Spark Miles for Business: Best for travel credit
    • Capital One Spark Classic for Business: Best for fair credit

    When you redeem your credit card rewards, you should also look to redeem in the form of a gift card. Companies often times offer gift cards that you can purchase with credit card rewards points. From a dollar per points perspective, you’ll get the most bang for your buck using this strategy. If you know you’re going to need to make some big purchases on office supplies, look to purchase a gift card for Ikea for example. Using these simple but effective strategies are a great way to save much needed cash especially on larger purchases.

    5. Free trials and consultations.

    There’s no better way to save money than to get a service for free. Instead of investing large amounts of money in enterprise software for your business, you can find much less expensive SaaS tools to meet your needs. These services often provide free trials, some as long as a month. After the trial period is over, they’ll typically offer tiered pricing that allows you to pay as you scale your business. Whether it’s a payments solution, CRM software, or simple accounting tools, you should always start with a free trial.

    Free consultations are very effective when seeking legal advice. Some business attorney’s charge as high as $600/hour and bill you to the second. Typically, a lawyer will give you about 30 minutes to even an hour of time as a consultation with the assumption you’ll choose them as your legal council. If you’re just looking to get a few questions answered, use a few attorney’s and get a few consultations. If you use this trick with three or four attorney’s you’ve just saved well over $1000 in legal fees.

    6. Review your expenses quarterly.

    Generally, you should be well aware of your expenses at all times. However, it’s best to do a full analysis quarterly to determine which expenses are necessary and which aren’t. Software that you used last quarter may be obsolete to your business now, so you’ll want to cancel that subscription. It’s easy to forget about all the various software and business tools you’ve signed up for over the years. It’s good to “trim the fat” each quarter so you can make every penny count.

    Regardless the size of your business it’s very important to stay on top of your finances and be frugal. Especially for smaller companies, your growth depends heavily on how your dollar is spent. If you implement these six strategies you can save your business thousands of dollars each month, so get out and build that business!

    Source: www.entrepreneur.com

    Call, text, email, or stop by our Los Angeles HQ today!
    Helvetia Holdings Group, LLC
    Wells Fargo (HQ) Building
    11601 Wilshire Blvd. 5th Floor
    Los Angeles, CA, 90025
    United States of America

    Phone: +1.310.800.2197
    info@www.p2pdevelopers.com
    Skype Username: p2pdevelopers
    Google hangouts: p2pdevelopers@gmail.com

    Read More
    0 118
  • How Changes to the Way We Search Will Impact Businesses

    Changes in paths to consume content and experiences have emerged through technologies that offer a glimpse into what search may look like in the not-so-distant future.

    Today’s search engines are one of the primary paths to content experiences on the web. Shopping, research, directions and questions all pass through Google (and to a lesser extent Bing and Yahoo) as the entry point to solutions-seeking. Generally, the experience is the destination, and search engines have done a fine job of channeling users to the precise experience they’re looking for.

    What if, however, the end result could be reached earlier, circumventing today’s path? Changes in paths to consume content and experiences have emerged through technologies that offer a glimpse into what search may look like in the not-so-distant future.

    With Google Answers and Google My Business data dominating in search results, and providing data and answers to the user directly after they search, it eliminates the need for a user to click through to a website. While this might not be a delightful or engaging content experience, a very distinct need is being addressed through answers and data delivery right in the search engine results pages. Consequently, disruptive technology companies (Google being one of them) have plans to delight in other ways — almost certainly changing the search landscape as we know it.

    Human language search

    We’re currently witnessing the rise of voice search on our personal devices. The results are simple answers and data, similar to what we see displayed visually via Answers boxes and Google My Business. An interesting trend that has emerged since Siri and Cortana came on the scene is our “human language search” approach to the way we query. Speaking to our devices in the same way we speak to a barista or store clerk, this behavior has followed us back to our keyboards when we search on desktop and mobile. This suits search engines well, as we tend to be clearer with our intent and context when we search this way versus the old-school Boolean method.

    Anything more detailed than your device returning simple answers or asking for a next step, however, will require better familiarity between the user and the search engine. If we’re to expect the disappearance of the keyboard and rely on voice completely, machine learning and personalization will need to evolve. At the very least, we’ll be tethered to something that forces us to select the next step for the foreseeable future, even if we speak to them like other humans. With Google Lensvisual search, however, all bets may be off.

     

    Digital personal assistants

    Google Home, Amazon Alexa and others have taken search results a step further, neatly bypassing displayable data with answers, weather data and news being read aloud, versus a query, click or scroll. Commands to purchase can also be made through a digital personal assistant. What this means, however, is that chasing ownership of the top three results in search engines will be a thing of the past. When digital personal assistants are fed search results from the top spot, position one will be the only relevant position to own.

    Shopping may be a different story altogether if your device prioritizes results from its own ecosystem over rival search engines. Looking at how Amazon manages its Alexa devices today is just a preview into online shopping’s future.

    Everything in-platform

    As Google has evolved to meet the needs of users by limiting options and providing quick rewards directly in results pages, so have other complementary (and at times competitive) platforms.

    Facebook Instant Articles and Google AMP don’t take users too far away from the originating platform source, enabling them to return to whatever they were doing before something caught their eye. Solutions like Facebook Store integrate products for an in-platform shopping experience, tightening the gap between product discovery and purchase, while directing users away from Google’s fairly limitless shopping mall of possibilities.

    WeChat takes it a few steps further. What began as a messaging platform in China has become a robust social, commerce and payments ecosystem without a U.S. equivalent. Taking a taxi to dinner via WeChat can include hailing a ride, route sharing, messaging a photo from the cab and splitting payments all in a single platform. Meanwhile, the U.S. industry is still too fractured for full social and payments integration, meaning customers have limited social sharing in their ride sharing apps. In Uber’s current state, it just doesn’t seem realistic to pull a menu attached to your restaurant destination like it is in WeChat.

    But, to think that before Uber and Lyft we would have Googled for a local taxi company, visited its website for a phone number and manually dialed to speak to a human is remarkable. And it’s paved the way for introducing something like WeChat in the U.S., or at the very least, for a powerhouse like Facebook to integrate social media, services and payments that limits the necessity for some types of search behavior in the future.

    Hyper-personalization

    If you’re interested in how organic search will be impacted next, look to other digital marketing channels for the blueprint. In paid media, we see search and display ads based on demographics and browsing history. Programmatic display, beacon technology and more advanced targeting gets even creepier. In organic search today, we see results based on location and past purchases we may have made. Google’s search algorithm has brought us what the engines consider the most relevant results, but those results are rarely individualized in any meaningful way.

    Moving past simple targeting, machine learning and platform integration can deliver results to users on an absolute personal level. Imagine data from walled-in ecosystems like Facebook and a news site on the open web feeding data into Google’s organic algorithm to address our queries personally. Marketers are using beacon technology to know we were just at Starbucks and location data to know it’s about to rain in order to serve up the perfect ad creative. It’s only a matter of time before similar collections of intelligence can answer the “what should I do today in New York?” query with a relevant result that won’t have you over-caffeinated and caught in the rain.

    Source: www.entrepreneur.com

    Call, text, email, or stop by our Los Angeles HQ today!
    Helvetia Holdings Group, LLC
    Wells Fargo (HQ) Building
    11601 Wilshire Blvd. 5th Floor
    Los Angeles, CA, 90025
    United States of America

    Phone: +1.310.800.2197
    info@www.p2pdevelopers.com
    Skype Username: p2pdevelopers
    Google hangouts: p2pdevelopers@gmail.com

    Read More
    0 85
  • Why Personal Branding Must Be Your First Focus

    Consumers won’t buy from your company until they trust you.

    In today’s competitive business environment, it may seem nearly impossible to stand out. But many people have managed to step out of the shadows by opting for a strategy primarily used by businesses themselves — branding.

    Personal branding is the key to giving yourself an advantage both in your current job and when you search for a new one.

    Your personal brand is something that follows you around whether you want it to or not. It’s something that exists even if you don’t bother to cultivate it. From job to job, the way you present yourself professionally matters, and it is instrumental in establishing yourself as a valuable leader.

    What exactly is personal branding?

    Understanding the ins and outs of personal branding is obviously the first step in the right direction. The concept can be simply defined as the method of marketing yourself and your career to improve relationships with managers, colleagues and clients. Turning yourself into a brand helps you manage how you’re viewed and how much trust you can establish in your career. It involves creating a distinct voice, image and ethical standard.

    But, it’s also something that takes consistent work over the course of your career. That is to say, you can’t write a particularly excellent blog post one time and expect that to carry you through the rest of your life. On top of that, just generally having a social media presence is no longer enough to qualify as a personal brand.

    Building trust with those around you.

    Trust isn’t something that flourishes naturally on a wide scale. It’s something you have to cultivate, and the best way to do that is with a unique personal brand. When it comes to who consumers trust the most, it’s almost always individuals. Corporate branding may technically be more visible, but it’s almost universally seen as less trustworthy. In fact, brand messages are shared 24 times more often if the originator of the message is an individual.

    Clearly, you can use your personal brand to build trust as long as that brand reads as authentic and sincere.

    Finding a niche.

    One of the most valuable facets of a personal brand is discovering your niche. It can be difficult to stand out if your area of expertise is simply “marketing.” If you try something more specific, you can magnify yourself and your skills. Although your target demographic may be more narrow, you are more likely to connect with that audience. I have spent most of my career focusing on Wikipedia. May not sound exciting, but it has helped me stand out as a go-to person for those in need of a Wikipedia page.

    Becoming a thought leader.

    While becoming a thought leader might not be at the top of everyone’s to-do list, it can happen if you establish yourself in a niche. Whether you are writing articles or participating in interviews, a portfolio of helpful information and advice will propel you to thought leader status. Again, this is all about building trust with valuable and actionable guidance.

    Conclusion.

    In order to become a respected intellectual in your field, you have to know what you’re talking about, offer genuine counsel and really mean what you say. Done well, personal branding can walk side-by-side with personal development and career success.

    Source: www.entrepreneur.com

    Call, text, email, or stop by our Los Angeles HQ today!
    Helvetia Holdings Group, LLC
    Wells Fargo (HQ) Building
    11601 Wilshire Blvd. 5th Floor
    Los Angeles, CA, 90025
    United States of America

    Phone: +1.310.800.2197
    info@www.p2pdevelopers.com
    Skype Username: p2pdevelopers
    Google hangouts: p2pdevelopers@gmail.com

    Read More
    0 104
  • To Succeed, You Need to Be the Rock in a Storm

    He lost his passion and almost lost his business — here’s the philosophy that helped this business owner get back on his feet.

    In this ongoing series, we are sharing advice, tips and insights from real entrepreneurs who are out there doing business battle on a daily basis. (Answers have been edited and condensed for clarity.)

    Who are you and what’s your business?

    My name is Claude Florent. Ever since I was young, I told my friends that I wanted to have my own business. I wanted the challenge of creating things that make customers feel good. After working many years with big corporations and trying to buy at least 25 companies, I finally bought Rainguard, which manufactures chemical products for the construction industry. Today, I own five companies that range from coatings to paintballs to a new line of auto care products.

    What was your toughest challenge and how did you overcome it?

    Shortly after buying Rainguard, I got served with divorce papers. This just crushed me and I started to second-guess everything I did. I had friends tell me to pour myself into my business, but the problem was I only did what I did for my family — I was lost. I almost lost my passion for owning a business. I almost lost my business. This was the lowest point in my life. I can’t say that one day I looked up and there was a bright light from the heavens. My turnaround was gradual. What I do know today is I have an overwhelming desire to make the best products, to provide the best shopping experience and to have an environment that is great for the employees that are trading their time to help me accomplish our mission. I owe a debt of gratitude to all these people.

    Claude Florent

    What does the word “entrepreneur” mean to you?

    I belong to the Vistage coaching and advisory group in Orange County, Calif., and the business owners I meet are creative, willing to learn, humble and above all else never give up in serving their customers. This experience has ingrained in me a desire and passion for learning. I’m always searching for what I don’t see.

    What’s the problem you just solved or are attacking now?

    Our biggest challenge has always been to capture value in the markets where we compete. So our strategy had to change and it started this year by sponsoring IndyCar and NASCAR racing events at the Texas Motor Speedway. These are huge undertakings for large companies. But we took on the challenges and risks. Some of my friends thought I was nuts, said the learning curve was too great, the financial burden would overwhelm us, etc.

    What I learned is the art of alignment and the capacity for people to step up and take challenges, one step at a time. I learned to allow others to take this company and make it into something that’s bigger than my dreams. I have learned that as long as everyone understands what needs to be done, I simply have to get out of the way. I no longer wonder if I can keep up with the needs of these companies, I just “paint the target,” which has resulted in business growth like I have never seen prior.

    What trait do you depend on most when making decisions and why is that useful for you? 

    I am a person that loves to collaborate with people. This can involve employees at every level, vendors, customers, friends and other business executives such as my fellow Vistage members. I find that asking others for their thoughts and ideas makes a better outcome. Earlier in my career, I would try to out-think the task. Now, I find it much more enjoyable to see others grow and take ownership.

    Is there a particular quote or saying that you use as personal motivation? 

    In my office, I have a picture of water crashing a rock in the ocean by my home. The water is spraying all over the rock, but the rock does not move. The saying on the frame reads, “Be resolute while the oceans of life challenge you.” While I was going through a difficult period, my mentor simply said, “Claude, be the rock”. Those four simple words changed my life. I hope the readers of Entrepreneur see themselves as the rock in their businesses.

    Source: www.entrepreneur.com

    Call, text, email, or stop by our Los Angeles HQ today!
    Helvetia Holdings Group, LLC
    Wells Fargo (HQ) Building
    11601 Wilshire Blvd. 5th Floor
    Los Angeles, CA, 90025
    United States of America

    Phone: +1.310.800.2197
    info@www.p2pdevelopers.com
    Skype Username: p2pdevelopers
    Google hangouts: p2pdevelopers@gmail.com

    Read More
    0 103
  • 3 Things You Need to Do to Grow Your Business Naturally

    Stop focusing on growing your company and start improving your offerings.

    Building a successful business requires laser focus. Every entrepreneur wants to grow his or her business, but it’s that focus on growth that ultimately stands in the way of the desired growth.

    Confused?

    The point is that you can focus on growth all you want, but unless you find a way to provide more value, your growth will be slow. Take Amazon for example. They are constantly finding ways to provide more value to their customers — from free same-day shipping to testing 30-minute drone-delivery — and that sets them apart from other e-commerce retail options.

    The same value-focused approach can be applied to any business.

    I’m constantly networking, and since I spend a considerable amount of time in Oklahoma City these days, I have met several local business owners, one being Grover Walker, CEO of SaonMedia, a digital marketing, promotion and distribution company in the music industry.

    While speaking with Walker, we discussed business growth and the importance of providing value. Below are three value components that can grow your business naturally across every industry.

    1. Helping your customers become more successful and happier.

    “Our artists love creating music and performing, and our goal is to help them succeed and ‘make it’ in this extremely competitive industry. With each client comes a different sound and unique personality, which we develop the marketing campaign around. Simply helping our artists do what they love has resulted in countless referrals and further business relationships within the music industry,” explained Walker.

    This approach applies to everything — from business-to-business online marketing tools to consumer health and beauty products.

    An online invoicing and accounting tool helps a business be more efficient, allowing them to dedicate more time and focus on other areas of their business — helping them to become more successful. A consumer product like my teeth-whitening brand grows exponentially simply by making customers happy — in this case, by helping them whiten their teeth.

    2. Being more innovative than your competition.

    SaonMedia’s current focus is digital distribution to major digital and mobile retailers, and in the early years of development, they were limited to just music digital distribution to a select few digital retailers. However, after securing a deal with distribution giant The Orchard, they emerged as a leading distributor in the music industry.

    “It took careful research and hands-on experience to realize that distribution alone was not enough for our artists,” explained Walker. “We realized that content marketing and promotion created valuable engagement between our music artists and their fans. We then developed a platform for artists to market and promote their music in a more efficient manner.”

    Now, SaonMedia offers their marketing platform, consisting of music and video placement, content creation and radio play, to all independent artists. This approach allows music artists to deal with one company rather than several.

    3. Giving your customers something your competitors can’t.

    Walker’s company introduced this new marketing platform for independent music artists, which was something that his competition wasn’t focused on, explaining, “We believe that a direct-to-consumer strategy is an important key to success in the digital marketplace, so we made it a priority to offer this to our artists to help them succeed in a very competitive industry.”

    This point circles back to the beginning, where I used Amazon’s 30-minute drone-delivery service as an example. They were the first to come to market with this, but one would be foolish to think that other e-commerce giants won’t follow behind.

    That doesn’t make Amazon’s efforts any less meaningful — natural growth is about constantly finding new ways to provide extra value that isn’t found elsewhere. “If you are struggling to come up with ideas, poll your customers. Simply asking them how you can deliver more value will often provide you with the feedback required,” advises Marc Anidjar, attorney and co-founder of Anidjar & Levine, P.A.

    Source: www.entrepreneur.com

    Call, text, email, or stop by our Los Angeles HQ today!
    Helvetia Holdings Group, LLC
    Wells Fargo (HQ) Building
    11601 Wilshire Blvd. 5th Floor
    Los Angeles, CA, 90025
    United States of America

    Phone: +1.310.800.2197
    info@www.p2pdevelopers.com
    Skype Username: p2pdevelopers
    Google hangouts: p2pdevelopers@gmail.com

    Read More
    0 110
  • 5 common mistakes guaranteed to screw up your PR strategy

    Successful people know how to learn from their own mistakes. Really successful people know how to learn from the mistakes of others.

    Here are some of the most common PR blunders that you can learn to avoid in the first place.

    1. Taking the press for granted

    PR requires a concerted effort. It does when your company is a billion-dollar corporate giant, and it especially does when your company isn’t.

    The most fundamental mistake you can make in PR is assuming that, by virtue of being interesting, cutting-edge, groundbreaking or whatever other superlative you like, your company is somehow entitled to press.

    Media coverage isn’t a favor and it isn’t going to come out and find you. News outlets are businesses: businesses that traffic in news. In order to get press, you have to convince the press you have news to offer.

    What qualifies as news? Well, that varies depending on the publication and writer and what exactly your business consists of. But these are a few standard announcements every business should be looking to use as launch platforms for outreach:

    • Product Launches: You’re starting your business or releasing a new product
    • Fundraising: You’ve just raised a Series A
    • Milestones: Your company’s mobile app reaches 100,000 downloads
    • Acquisitions: Your company acquires, or is acquired by, another company

    Do your research and pitch to the right outlet and person.

    2. Gabbing on and on

    mouth open

    Most pitches will fail, regardless of how well you craft them. But one of the best ways to get your email dumped straight into the trash bin is to send journalists what looks like a copy of your latest memoirs.

    According to a recent survey by MuckRack, 59 percent of journalists want pitches to come in at two or three paragraphs, while 36 percent of journalists said two to three sentences.

    Meanwhile, only 5 percent want to receive pitches that are more than 500 words. The survey found length was the second biggest reason pitches were rejected.

    That’s only fair. Entrepreneurs should be familiar enough with the elevator pitch scenario, and for the same reason you wouldn’t expect an investor to want to listen to all the intimate details of your business operation up front, you shouldn’t count on journalists to take that kind of time, either.

    A pitch is just a teaser. Don’t try and write the article for them.

    If there’s some particularly vital piece of information, you can always add it in an attachment, but offering to send it over later is a better call to action.

    Here is an actual email pitch my company sent out that got back very positive feedback from a journalist. It’ll take some experimenting to finesse the art of the pitch, but with practice, you’ll learn what works and what doesn’t.

    Hi [redacted],

    Hope aIl is well. If you are too swamped to reply, no worries. I just wanted to give you a heads up about the $1 million raised by Startup Stock Exchange (SSX), which allows investors to use the security and liquidity of a regulated stock exchange to invest in startups from around the world, particularly Latin America.

    For many companies in Latin America looking to raise funding, there is a limited market of investors (and often times the terms are not fair). SSX enables international start-ups and small businesses to attract qualified global investors on a regulated public stock exchange.

    After reading the articles on your site (I particularly thought the The Periodic Table of Content Marketing was neat), I thought SSX might peak your interest.

    If you may be interested, we are more than happy to arrange an interview. However, we completely understand if you ultimately decide not to publish.

    If this pitch isn’t right for you at the moment, thanks again for your time and energy and I hope you have a good rest of the day.

    Andrew Wright

    Marketing, Publicize

    3. Ignoring the timing

    Journalists are extremely busy people whose professional – and often non-professional – lives are spent chasing one frantic deadline after another. But there are times when they’re less busy than others, and those are the times you probably want to be reaching them.

    According to the MuckRack survey, 27 percent of journalists prefer to be contacted between 6 and 9 AM and another 43 percent between 9 to 11 AM. That is to say, roughly 70 percent of journalists want to be contacted in the morning.

    It’s easy enough to understand why that might be. As the day drags on, work piles on top of unexpected obligations on top of ordinary backlog, and before you know it, it’s time to go home and worry about everything you didn’t get accomplished.

    We’re all familiar with how that goes. Now picture what it’s like in a setting as fast-paced as a newsroom.

    The same principle applies to the work week in general. By the time Friday rolls around, most journalists are just hoping to survive until the weekend.

    It’s hard enough to stand out amid all the other stories competing for a journalist’s attention. Email early in the day and early in the week to ensure your pitch isn’t also vying against accumulated stress and sleep loss.

    4. Coming off cold and impersonal

    71042723

    You can put all the time and care in the world into crafting a personalized email pitch, but if there’s nothing in the text itself to show that, a journalist is going to assume, by default, that she was on the receiving end of a chainmail sent to 50 of her colleagues. And she is going to press delete.

    Over a quarter of journalists surveyed by MuckRack said the main reason they rejected email pitches was a spammy, impersonal feel.

    One main explanation for this aversion is that cold, standardized text makes journalists assume other journalists are also being presented with the same pitch, and the news industry puts a high value on being the first to a story. Even just on the level of interpersonal exchange, though, making an extra effort to tailor a pitch can pay dividends in the future.

    Remember that with PR, the goal isn’t just to get a given pitch picked up, it’s to set a positive tone for a relationship going forward. Gaining someone’s ear is half the battle.

    Here’s some advice to follow:

    Know the journalist you are pitching to: There’s plenty you can do to feign personal interest, but ultimately, nothing will work as well as actually getting to know the journalists you’re hoping to pitch to.

    What do they like to cover? What angles do they go for? How can you cater a pitch to fit their interests? (Including their name in the greeting line rather than a “Dear editor” is a good start.) Staying up to date with the media landscape will help you come pitch time, but it’s also good standard policy for understanding market trends and understanding the news business.

    Connect on social media: Fortunately, the internet has created unprecedented access to journalists and the publications they work for. Stay active on social media. Join discussions. Retweet your favorite writers.

    As silly as it may sound, social media is one of the first places journalists will look to gauge you and your company. Maintaining an engaged professional network and keeping up with the latest is one way to convey seriousness. It also tells a journalist that any story they write on you can count on reaching a certain guaranteed audience.

    Include social proof in email pitch: Even in the digital age, and perhaps especially in the digital age, all the traditional status symbols still carry weight. If you carry a card in any field, play it.

    If your school has a heavy name, drop it. The same goes for awards and the like. Don’t spend half the email buttering yourself up, but don’t worry about coming off as pretentious either. It’s okay to mention your achievements.

    Be polite: This may seem like a no-brainer, but you’d be surprised how far a few kind words will take you and at how many people eschew the common courtesies altogether.

    Thank journalists for their time and attention. And show them you mean it by keeping your requests reasonable and your email concise.

    5. Forgetting to follow up

    Never assume your emails have gotten read and never assume a lack of response means they haven’t. Outreach is the first step in PR, but following up is an implicit part of that.

    If you haven’t received an email back after a day or two, it won’t hurt to send another email checking in on how things are going.

    Delays are common in PR, and as often as not, a journalist who doesn’t respond has either forgotten to or never found the time. Either way, they’ll appreciate a reminder. It’s never good to be pushy, but as long as you’re polite and concise, you don’t have to worry about coming off that way.

    Good PR is about getting a foot in the door. Avoiding these common mistakes won’t get you coverage, but they will keep you from banging your head on the doorframe.

     

    Source: www.thenextweb.com

    Call, text, email, or stop by our Los Angeles HQ today!
    Helvetia Holdings Group, LLC
    Wells Fargo (HQ) Building
    11601 Wilshire Blvd. 5th Floor
    Los Angeles, CA, 90025
    United States of America

    Phone: +1.310.800.2197
    info@www.p2pdevelopers.com
    Skype Username: p2pdevelopers
    Google hangouts: p2pdevelopers@gmail.com

    Read More
    0 175
  • IoT Fuels Growth of Linux Malware

    Malware targeting Linux systems is growing, largely due to a proliferation of devices created to connect to the Internet of Things.

    That is one of the findings in a report WatchGuard Technologies, a maker of network security appliances, released last week.

    The report, which analyzes data gathered from more than 26,000 appliances worldwide, found three Linux malware programs in the top 10 for the first quarter of the year, compared with only one during the previous period.

    “Linux attacks and malware are on the rise,” wrote WatchGuard CTO Corey Nachreiner and Security Threat Analyst Marc Laliberte, coauthors of the report. “We believe this is because systemic weaknesses in IoT devices, paired with their rapid growth, are steering botnet authors towards the Linux platform.”

    However, “blocking inbound Telnet and SSH, along with using complex administrative passwords, can prevent the vast majority of potential attacks,” they suggested.

    Linux malware began growing at the end of last year with the Mirai botnet, observed Laliberte. Mirai made a splash in September when it was used to attack part of the Internet’s infrastructure and knock millions of users offline.

    “Now, with IoT devices skyrocketing, a whole new avenue is opening up to attackers,” he told LinuxInsider. “It’s our belief that the rise we’re seeing in Linux malware is going hand in hand with that new target on the Internet.”

    Makers of IoT devices haven’t been showing a great deal of concern about security, Laliberte continued. Their goals are to make their devices work, make them cheap, and make them quickly.

    “They really don’t care about security during the development process,” he said.

    Trivial Pursuits

    Most IoT manufacturers use stripped down versions of Linux because the operating system requires minimal system resources to operate, said Paul Fletcher, cybersecurity evangelist at Alert Logic.

    “When you combine that with the large quantity of IoT devices being connected to the Internet, that equals a large volume of Linux systems online and available for attack,” he told LinuxInsider.

    In their desire to make their devices easy to use, manufacturers use protocols that are also user-friendly for hackers.

    “Attackers can gain access to these vulnerable interfaces, then upload and execute the malicious code of their choice,” Fletcher said.

    Manufacturers frequently have poor default settings for their devices, he pointed out.

    “Often, admin accounts have blank passwords or easy-to-guess default passwords, such as ‘password123,'” Fletcher said.

    The security problems often are “nothing Linux-specific per se,” said Johannes B. Ullrich, chief research officer at the SANS Institute.

    “The manufacturer is careless on how they configured the device, so they make it trivial to exploit these devices,” he told LinuxInsider.

    Malware in Top 10

    These Linux malware programs cracked the top 10 in WatchGuard’s tally for the first quarter:

    • Linux/Exploit, which catches several malicious trojans used to scan systems for devices that can be enlisted into a botnet.
    • Linux/Downloader, which catches malevolent Linux shell scripts. Linux runs on many different architectures, such as ARM, MIPS and traditional x86 chipsets. An executable compiled for one architecture will not run on a device running a different one, the report explains. Thus, some Linux attacks exploit dropper shell scripts to download and install the proper malicious components for the architecture they are infecting.
    • Linux/Flooder, which catches Linux distributed-denial-of-service tools, such as Tsunami, used to perform DDoS amplification attacks, as well as DDoS tools used by Linux botnets like Mirai. “As the Mirai botnet showed us, Linux-based IoT devices are a prime target for botnet armies,” the report notes.

    Web Server Battleground

    A shift in how adversaries are attacking the Web has occurred, the WatchGuard report notes.

    At the end of 2016, 73 percent of Web attacks targeted clients — browsers and supporting software, the company found. That radically changed during the first three months of this year, with 82 percent of Web attacks focused on Web servers or Web-based services.

    “We don’t think drive-by download style attacks will go away, but it appears attackers have focused their efforts and tools on trying to exploit Web server attacks,” report coauthors Nachreiner and Laliberte wrote.

    There’s been a decline in the effectiveness of antivirus software since the end of 2016, they also found.

    “For the second quarter in a row, we have seen our legacy AV solution miss a lot of malware that our more advanced solution can catch. In fact, it has gone up from 30 percent to 38 percent,” Nachreiner and Laliberte reported.

     

    Source: www.technewsworld.com

    Call, text, email, or stop by our Los Angeles HQ today!
    Helvetia Holdings Group, LLC
    Wells Fargo (HQ) Building
    11601 Wilshire Blvd. 5th Floor
    Los Angeles, CA, 90025
    United States of America

    Phone: +1.310.800.2197
    info@www.p2pdevelopers.com
    Skype Username: p2pdevelopers
    Google hangouts: p2pdevelopers@gmail.com

    Read More
    0 101
  • Google Makes It Easier to Create Virtual Reality Videos

    Google last week introduced a new video format, VR180, developed with input from its Daydream team.

    The VR180 format, which displays what’s in front of the user only, delivers good video quality both on desktop PCs and mobile devices.

    While VR180 videos appear in 2D on desktops and mobile devices, they appear in 3D VR when viewed with Cardboard, Google’s Daydream headset or Sony’s PlayStation VR headset.

    The VR180 Creative Process

    Creators “don’t have to choose between making a 360 video and/or providing new content for their subscribers,” said Google spokesperson Liz Markman.

    “It’s easy for creators to start producing VR videos since they won’t have to change up their filming style or production techniques,” she told TechNewsWorld. “There’s no need to think about what’s behind the camera.”

    YouTube supports VR180, so it “works anywhere YouTube is,” Markman pointed out. VR180 also supports live-streaming videos.

    Video creators can set up and film videos just like they would with any other camera. They can use their existing equipment, or eligible creators can apply to borrow a VR180-enabled camera from a YouTube Space in certain cities, including London, Paris and New York.

    They soon will be able to edit the videos using familiar tools such as Adobe Premiere Pro.

    Content creation issues aside, “VR headsets are still very intrusive and cumbersome,” observed Trip Chowdhry, managing director for equity research at Global Equities Research.

    “The VR industry is still not ready to take off,” he told TechNewsWorld.

    Making VR Technology Less Expensive

    Companies including Yi Technology, Lenovo and LG have committed to building cameras from the ground up for VR180.

    They will be as easy to use as point-and-shoot cameras and cost about the same, according to Google’s Markman.

    The cameras will be available this winter. They will target consumers and “will be tightly integrated into our services, like YouTube, so it’s easy to go from filming to uploading,” Markman pointed out.

    Google will offer a VR180 certification for other manufacturers. Z Cam will be one of its first partners.

    Both the VR camera space and VR video content are forecast to experience “tremendous growth,” said Sam Rosen, a vice president at ABI Research.

    Each segment will hit nearly US$7 billion by 2021, he told TechNewsWorld.

    Clever Use of Technology

    VR180 halves the viewing angle so consumers viewing videos on browsers and smartphones will see two 180-degree images of an object, one with each eye.

    This “is more natural and pervasive from a camera technology standpoint,” ABI’s Rosen observed.

    Google isn’t the first company to offer this capability, he said. Lucid VR will ship this month, for example.

    However, based on its evaluation of early versions of the technology, ABI has “found it failed to adequately handle some of the complexity with 3D video,” said Rosen

    It’s likely that Google will integrate VR180 into wearables, including smart glasses, to compete with Snapchat, he suggested.

    Not Yet Ready for Prime Time

    The VR180 format has applications in various segments, such as demo videos in the real estate and art fields; as productivity tools for remote workers; and perhaps gaming, as part of a mixed reality platform, said Jim McGregor, principal analyst at Tirias Research.

    The ease of development and use lets anyone create VR content “with relatively inexpensive equipment,” he told TechNewsWorld. “This is much better than offering a high-end solution that takes years for an OEM to develop a solution that’s offered at a high cost to consumers.”

    That said, “it’s interesting that we see these new video formats being adopted in alternative media spaces like social networking and YouTube videos, not traditional media,” McGregor noted. “This is possibly because the user base is still too small.”

    Google last week introduced a new video format, VR180, developed with input from its Daydream team. The VR180 format, which displays what’s in front of the user only, delivers good video quality both on desktop PCs and mobile devices. While VR180 videos appear in 2D on desktops and mobile devices, they appear in 3D VR when viewed with Cardboard, Google’s Daydream headset or Sony’s PlayStation VR headset. The VR180 Creative Process Creators “don’t have to choose between making a 360 video and/or providing new content for their subscribers,” said Google spokesperson Liz Markman. “It’s easy for creators to start producing VR videos since they won’t have to change up their filming style or production techniques,” she told TechNewsWorld. “There’s no need to think about what’s behind the camera.” YouTube supports VR180, so it “works anywhere YouTube is,” Markman pointed out. VR180 also supports live-streaming videos. Video creators can set up and film videos just like they would with any other camera. They can use their existing equipment, or eligible creators can apply to borrow a VR180-enabled camera from a YouTube Space in certain cities, including London, Paris and New York. They soon will be able to edit the videos using familiar tools such as Adobe Premiere Pro. Content creation issues aside, “VR headsets are still very intrusive and cumbersome,” observed Trip Chowdhry, managing director for equity research at Global Equities Research. “The VR industry is still not ready to take off,” he told TechNewsWorld. Making VR Technology Less Expensive Companies including Yi Technology, Lenovo and LG have committed to building cameras from the ground up for VR180. They will be as easy to use as point-and-shoot cameras and cost about the same, according to Google’s Markman. The cameras will be available this winter. They will target consumers and “will be tightly integrated into our services, like YouTube, so it’s easy to go from filming to uploading,” Markman pointed out. Google will offer a VR180 certification for other manufacturers. Z Cam will be one of its first partners. Both the VR camera space and VR video content are forecast to experience “tremendous growth,” said Sam Rosen, a vice president at ABI Research. Each segment will hit nearly US$7 billion by 2021, he told TechNewsWorld. Clever Use of Technology VR180 halves the viewing angle so consumers viewing videos on browsers and smartphones will see two 180-degree images of an object, one with each eye. This “is more natural and pervasive from a camera technology standpoint,” ABI’s Rosen observed. Google isn’t the first company to offer this capability, he said. Lucid VR will ship this month, for example. However, based on its evaluation of early versions of the technology, ABI has “found it failed to adequately handle some of the complexity with 3D video,” said Rosen It’s likely that Google will integrate VR180 into wearables, including smart glasses, to compete with Snapchat, he suggested. Not Yet Ready for Prime Time The VR180 format has applications in various segments, such as demo videos in the real estate and art fields; as productivity tools for remote workers; and perhaps gaming, as part of a mixed reality platform, said Jim McGregor, principal analyst at Tirias Research. The ease of development and use lets anyone create VR content “with relatively inexpensive equipment,” he told TechNewsWorld. “This is much better than offering a high-end solution that takes years for an OEM to develop a solution that’s offered at a high cost to consumers.” That said, “it’s interesting that we see these new video formats being adopted in alternative media spaces like social networking and YouTube videos, not traditional media,” McGregor noted. “This is possibly because the user base is still too small.”

     

    Source: www.technewsworld.com

    Call, text, email, or stop by our Los Angeles HQ today!
    Helvetia Holdings Group, LLC
    Wells Fargo (HQ) Building
    11601 Wilshire Blvd. 5th Floor
    Los Angeles, CA, 90025
    United States of America

    Phone: +1.310.800.2197
    info@www.p2pdevelopers.com
    Skype Username: p2pdevelopers
    Google hangouts: p2pdevelopers@gmail.com

    Read More
    0 98
  • The sector that didn’t exist 10 years ago now employing more than 100,000 Aussies

    MORE than 100,000 Australians are employed in the mobile applications sector, many working in roles that a decade ago hadn’t even been dreamt up.

    A new report by the Progressive Policy Institute estimates there are 113,000 Australian workers in the sector — up 11 per cent since 2014.

    It places Australia’s app intensity — the number of app jobs as a percentage of total jobs — at 0.9 per cent, which is stronger than Europe (0.8 per cent) but behind the US (1.1 per cent).

    PPI chief economic strategist and report author Michael Mandel says a surprisingly broad range of enterprises are searching for workers with the ability to design, develop, maintain or support mobile applications.

    “Remember that any app is exportable, in the sense that it can be downloaded from an app store by anybody around the world, no matter how far the distance,” he says.

    “That means the Australian App Economy can become a basis for continued growth. In addition, apps can improve the efficiency and attractiveness of the Australian economy.”

    Apple opened the App Store in 2008 and Android followed with Android Market, now known as Google Play.

    Since then, the sector has employed both IT-related workers such as those developing the applications as well as non-IT workers such as in sales, marketing and finance.

    New South Wales dominates the sector with 56,100 workers despite the Australian Capital Territory having the highest app intensity at 2.4 per cent.

    NSW is followed by Victoria with 29,000 workers, Queensland with 14,500, the ACT with 5200, Western Australia with 4400, South Australia with 1600, Tasmania with 1300, and the Northern Territory with 400.

    Workers are employed by large and small app developers, software and media companies, financial and retail companies, Australian and overseas tech companies, nonprofits and government agencies, large corporations that develop and maintain apps, and accounting and

    IT consulting firms.

    More roles are dedicated to Apple’s iOS apps (86 per cent of workers) than Android apps (77 per cent), although most work with both.

     

    Source: News Corp Australia Network

    Read More
    0 68
  • P2P Developers


    A year ago we came up with a great idea to use the old principle of implementing peer-to-peer information sharing into our platform and business development. As you may or may not know, peer-to-peer sharing is a process based on sharing and transferring files from one computer to another.In a P2P network, each “peer” is an end-user’s computer connected to the another “peer”.
    Since P2P programs can be an efficient way to share large files with others, thay are also used to facilitate direct communications between computers or device users. Chances are you’re already using some form of P2P technology. For example, Skype built its communications systems on P2P technology.
    Now, since we gave you a crash course about P2P, let us explain you who we are!

    Using this ideology and idea, we created our business approach. Exactly what does this mean? Knowing that there are many freelancers around the world involved with developing, designing, programming, coding, etc., etc., we created a worldwide network of all developers under one roof. Each project we take is shared with all of our 100s of associates around the world, and they are informed about what is up for grabs. This is how all of them are automatically involved in developing each and every project. We can easily claim that we work 24 hours a day 365 days a year. Even if some of our developers for some reason are not capable to continue with your project, through our P2P network we find a replacement right away so there is no gap or down-time at all. Once we commit to your task, we will deliver it as agreed. This reason alone is why we are by far the most reliable but also the most affordable app-developing service on the market today.

    • iOS App Development

      We are a top iOS app development company. We create native iOS applications of any complexity for iPad and iPhone.
    • Android App Development

      Developing custom Android mobile app development is one of our specialties. Just name it, and we will create your app!
    • App  Funding

      You have an idea, but don’t have money for it? Just contact us, and we will find the best investor for your application!
    • iOS  App Development

      We are a top iOS app development company. We create native iOS applications of any complexity for iPad and iPhone.
    • Android
      App Development

      Developing custom Android mobile app development is one of our specialties. Just name it, and we will create your app!

    • App
      Design

      We can create the most beautiful design for your apps, just tell us what do you want and give our designers a try.
    • App
      Marketing

      You have an app, now you need to spread the world about it. Just give a chance to our marketing team, and start counting installs.
    • Professional
      Team

      More than 1200 experienced people work for P2P developers! And every day, new members are coming to our team.
    Read More
    0 129